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Reliability Of Older Is-f


sam_gs300
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Hi all,

We've had a few Lexus vehicles and have been impressed with their reliability (when maintained properly). This is for the 6 cylinder's. We had a GS300 which almost hit 200k before we got rid of it and the RX350 that we have now has been great.

My question relates to the V8's however. I'm looking into getting into an IS-F, but budget would really only allow a 2008 or 2009 model currently. What are these things like reliability wise and maintenance wise for future repairs and costs? My other option is to go for a newer (2010 to 2012) IS350 F Type, but would love to get back into a V8 again. My other options are a FPV FT-E or Chrysler 300 SRT8.

Thanks

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ISF dont really have much problems at all

never really heard anything major go wrong with them yet esp with engine wise

just like most performance cars

proper maintanence

brake pads and rotor arent really that expensive

only common problem with the 2URGSE motoro is the leaking waterpump but that can be fixed easily

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Thanks.

What about mileage? What mileage have members got their ISF up to without major issues? I guess I'm asking is it reasonable to buy one with say 100,000 km's on it without it costing you the bomb to keep well maintained.

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They're as reliable as any other Lexus. Much of the bare engine design had been in play for a while, so it's proven. Some US owners have gone over 200k miles no issues which is beyond any AU cars I bet.

As long as it's serviced correctly & not subject to silly abuse or ignorent modification, it'll be fine. Brake replacement parts are prolly the only expensive bit, but you can save some money on that if you're smart & not desperate to get those parts immediately.

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heres a few tips and such i can tell you after owning an ISF for 5 years

1. Usual service cost 300-400 due to the fact u need 10L of engine oil

2. Brakes and pads are usually the expensive consumables other than tyres (a full set of pads and rotors can cost up to 3-4K with OEM parts but aftermarket parts u can get away with 1500-2000

3. Eventhough the transmission is sealed for life i flushed mine out once a year being a performance transmission they seem to get dirty quickly but doesnt really affect the performance

4. Spark plugs are pretty much a non essential item and i only replaced mine when i wanted to refreshen up but some members havent even changed theirs once yet

5. Petrol depends on how u drive it 65L tank will get your anywhere between 300-600 depending on your driving style close to 800-900kms on the free way

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all I can add to this that I used to have an 08 model which I tracked regularly and used as a daily, not a single major problem, it had 110K on the meter when we parted ways. I would not worry about reliability issues if maintained properly. Make sure its been looked after and serviced as per schedule and you should be fine.

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My view is the V8 is it is relatively understressed - being a recent convert to Lexus I was little disappointed to see the performance V8 redline wan't real high (6,800).

However reading about the history of the IS F; although the head engineer wanted it to rev to ~7500, the conservative Lexus executive were wedded to ensuring the reliability fitted with the company's ethos that a luxury car's V8 should be good for 300k km of problem free motoring - hence the redline was woundback for longevity.

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80% at most I meant. The long motor's as you said not even close. The injectors, pump etc are usually @ 80% or less. Although given the very limited power adding potential due to the ECU (meaning majority will be spared poor modification), I forsee ISF's outliving their peers (C63, M3 etc) by a long shot. Just like the original LS400's.

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I don't know about 700hp, given the motor isn't suitable to utilise forced induction (high comp). However, if it could be ecu tuned, add cams, additional head work, flex fuel setup, coupled with the usual intake/headers/exhaust.......result would be some happy all motor times. Rebuilding the bottom end to suit turbocharging/supercharging & 4-figure horsepower would be on the cards. 5.0L of displacement will shine.

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I don't know about 700hp, given the motor isn't suitable to utilise forced induction (high comp). However, if it could be ecu tuned, add cams, additional head work, flex fuel setup, coupled with the usual intake/headers/exhaust.......result would be some happy all motor times. Rebuilding the bottom end to suit turbocharging/supercharging & 4-figure horsepower would be on the cards. 5.0L of displacement will shine.

not to mention the gearbox too

gearbox is only good for 600hp max

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Do you think that they are being overly cautious with the 550 NM max rating on the gearbox?

anything over 600nm the box seems to be slipping too

run around 200shots of nitro or more

the gearbox seems to slip too

im sure u can strenghten it with some other toyota parts

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Using nitrous for sure. The record for all motor no giggle gas is 11.8 on radials (full bolt ons, cold night @ low altitude well prepped strip), outright record with nitrous is just under 11 now I believe. Nitrous systems are smarter than they used to be (used to run it myself - still have it if someone wants to give it a shot), but there's still the obvious problem of not always being able to use it & running out of gas after 10-12 shots.

The turbocharged ISF's etc, never appear to hit the drags or track. I wouldn't expect much from them though given they run low boost setups without true/fine EFI tuning.

Transmission really wouldn't be a big problem IMO, a solution wouldn't be too difficult. If anyone really wants to give it a go, they can run a standalone right now & ditch some of the direct injection & move to a more traditional/manageable setup (pre injection). Personally, I wouldn't try turn an ISF into a 4-figure horsepower monster. Fundamentally, it's heavy & won't have as much traction as some of the competition. Not to mention the development cost, inherit to being the first to do it.

Motor's provided for motorsport (drag racing) aren't packaged ISF motors, but the bare potential is the same. It's the ISF/production model ancillaries that are the complication.

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